Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Haunted New Orleans part 2

Who you going to call? No this is where King Creole was filmed.

All boys home (orphanage) now hotel.. guests still hear children running around.


Leaches: not Anna Nicole Smith
Dr. Dupas:

Downeys chemistry set
The New Orleans Pharmacy Museum is located on Chartres Street in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Louis Duffulo was a physician and the first registered pharmacist in the United States. He built the townhouse in 1823 and practiced there for 35 years. What a fine citizen.. Helping man-kind he was such a wonderful man. that Walgreen's decided to turn his place into the pharmacy museum.

When he died, Dr. Dupas purchased the building- There goes the neighborhood.. People would go into the building, but never come out. On the second floor of the building Dr. Dupas would conduct experiments on pregnant slaves, gut and examine, test  medicine/experiments on people that had diseases with no diagnosis.
Dr. Dupas also made potions that were a mixture of voodoo ingredients, herbal remedies, and recent medicines that were to come from Europe. These potions were given in large doses without any regard to side-effects. The female slaves that received them suffered major birth defects and usually resulted in the death of many mothers. Legend has it that Dr. Dupas dumped the bodies of these people through a trap door on the second-floor, where there was a wagon waiting in the carriageway on the left side of the building. It is also inferred from this that bodies were snuck in the building by the same means.




YOU GOTTA BE A DRACULER TO GIVE BIRTH TO A DRACULER!.. Early from the squid billies

Angie asked the tour guide if we were going to hunt Dracula's.. He asked "Do You mean vampires... Your in the wrong country...." This is taken from a web site explaining Who The hell Jacques Saint Germain is.

Eternally young, irresistibly beautiful yet deadly. VAMPIRES- In Europe, vampire epidemics have been reported as recently as the 1930s. And as early as- a former European colony, it should come as no surprise that Louisiana would have its own legends concerning the undead.
The most remarkable legend is that of Saint Germain. Making his first appearance in the court of aristocrats by regaling them with events from his “life.” An alchemist by trade, he claimed to be in possession of the “elixir of life,” and to have been over six thousand years old.
Contemporary accounts from the time record that despite being in the midst of many banquets and invited to the finest homes; he never ate at any of them. After a while, he left the French court and moved to Germany, where he was reported to have died. However, people continued to spot him throughout Europe even after his death.


Germains house we debunked this by stopping by the next day and people where there
In 1903, a handsome and charismatic young Frenchman named Jacques Saint Germain, claiming to be a descendant of the Count, arrived in New Orleans, taking residence in a house at the corner of Royal and Ursuline streets.
Possessing an eye for the ladies (like every NOLA man), Jacques was seen on the streets of the French Quarter on a nightly basis, with a different lady on his arm every night... Hookers.
One night a woman’s piercing scream was heard coming from Jacques’ French Quarter home.... a bad scream not a good one. The scream was quickly accompanied by the woman herself, who flung herself from the second story window, to land on the street below. As bystanders rushed to the aid of the young woman, she told them how Saint Germain attacked and bit her, and that she jumped out of the window to escape... ahhh that old story.
She died later that evening at Charity Hospital in New Orleans. By the time the New Orleans police kicked in the door of Saint Germain’s home, he had escaped. However, what they did find was disturbing nonetheless, large bloodstains in the wooden flooring, but even wine bottles filled with human blood.
The house was declared a crime scene and sealed off. From that evil night to the present day, no one lives in that home in the French Quarter.
It is private property and all taxes have been paid to date, but no one has been able to
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1 comment:

  1. Correction: The house has had occupants that use it as a vacation home for a few years. They decorated it in the 19th c. style, leave curtains open so people can glance in at night to see how it was. The two gentlemen that do reside part time have been known to talk to people asking about the legend and say that the window in question - which is bricked up as you can see, is now a bathroom and does have a fireplace in it.

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